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The Public Banking Revolution Is Upon Us — WEB OF DEBT BLOG

As public banking gains momentum across the country, policymakers in California and Washington state are vying to form the nation’s second state-owned bank, following in the footsteps of the highly successful Bank of North Dakota, founded in 1919. The race is close, with state bank bills now passing their first round of hearings in both […]

via The Public Banking Revolution Is Upon Us — WEB OF DEBT BLOG

Hopefully the public banking movement will continue to gain momentum in key states such as California which could definitely use a public bank.

Why Is the Fed Paying So Much Interest to Banks? — WEB OF DEBT BLOG

“If you invest your tuppence wisely in the bank, safe and sound, Soon that tuppence safely invested in the bank will compound, “And you’ll achieve that sense of conquest as your affluence expands In the hands of the directors who invest as propriety demands.” — Mary Poppins, 1964 When Mary Poppins was made into a […]

via Why Is the Fed Paying So Much Interest to Banks? — WEB OF DEBT BLOG

That is outrageous that the Federal Reserve is paying the big banks $36 billion dollars per year in interest. The big banks are paid 2.4% for parking their reserves with the Federal Reserve while the big banks only pay about 0.10% on the average savings account.

FIFTH U.S. CIRCUIT RULES FHFA UNCONSTITUTIONAL! — Clouded Titles Blog

BREAKING NEWS — OP-ED — This just received out of New Orleans … Collins et al v Mnuchin et al, 5th App Cir No 17-20364 (Jul 16, 2018) The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals denied damage awards to three investors who claim they lost money as shareholders in Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac due to […]

via FIFTH U.S. CIRCUIT RULES FHFA UNCONSTITUTIONAL! — Clouded Titles Blog

Hopefully more of the United States Circuit Courts of Appeal will agree with this decision and also find that the Federal Housing Finance Agency is unconstitutional.

What is in the shadow banking (derivative) marketplace?

When this shadow market in derivatives falls apart the crash will be even larger than the last one.

Livinglies's Weblog

Whether the total “nominal” value is $600 Trillion as reported in the link below or $1 Quadrillion as reported elsewhere, we know only a few things and those things by themselves require intense scrutiny that the government doesn’t want to do. So the burden of the mortgage meltdown is put entirely on the backs of homeowners and the banks who made paper and actual profits far up into the trillions of dollars get to keep their ill gotten gains.

In 1983 there was no shadow banking market. It simply wasn’t allowed. There was a secondary market where actual mortgage loans could be bought and sold but no shadow banking marketplace.

So we went from $0 to $600 Trillion-$1 Quadrillion in largely unreported, unaccountable, offshore and off balance sheet transactions, the proceeds of which are laundered back into the balance sheets and income statements of the banks to guarantee that they…

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Business Owners Shifting Risks of Failure to Trade Creditors: Solutions are Needed — MEDIATBANKRY

By Donald L. Swanson “Lending to the most highly indebted companies in the U.S. and Europe is surging.”— Wall Street Journal [Fn. 1] When a large business files for bankruptcy, there is one group that almost always suffers. It is a group with little-to-no power. It is the unsecured trade creditors. It is those that supply […]

via Business Owners Shifting Risks of Failure to Trade Creditors: Solutions are Needed — MEDIATBANKRY

I completely agree that trade creditors almost always wind up with little or nothing.   The trade creditors associations should organize and lobby for the amendments to the Bankruptcy Code that the author recommends.

Contingent Fees or Success Fees for Mediators: Why Not? — MEDIATBANKRY

By: Donald L. Swanson I have a new LinkedIn friend, Mark Winters from the U.K., who’s developed a mediation practice within an unusual context. And he’s making it work. Since the practice arose from his own creativity and out of unusual circumstances, he’s unbounded by common norms and can do creative things. One creativity is this: […]

via Contingent Fees or Success Fees for Mediators: Why Not? — MEDIATBANKRY

Interesting article. I agree with the author that contingency fees should be allowed in mediation as long as all of the parties involved have agreed.

Green Light for City-owned San Francisco Bank

Sadly even though it is almost 5 years since this article, neither San Francisco nor any other city in California, nor the State of California itself appear to be any closer to establishing a public bank. That is a testament to the power and political influence of the big banks which can afford to donate to both politicians in both parties to make sure that their nests are always well feathered.

WEB OF DEBT BLOG

When the Occupiers took an interest in moving San Francisco’s money into a city-owned bank in 2011, it was chiefly on principle, in sympathy with the nationwide Move Your Money campaign.  But recent scandals have transformed the move from a political statement into a matter of protecting the city’s deposits and reducing its debt burden.  The chief roadblock to forming a municipal bank has been the concern that it was not allowed under state law, but a legal opinion  issued by Deputy City Attorney Thomas J. Owen has now overcome that obstacle.

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