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REHYPOTHECATION IS YOUR WEAPON TO ESTABLISH THERE WAS NEVER A MORTGAGE LOAN – THESE WERE ALWAYS SECURITIES! — Deadly Clear

Originally posted on Deadly Clear: By Sydney Sullivan In a world where the American Dream and Wall Street greed collide, when your life and home are no longer your own, we must look beyond the facade of the documents and dig deeper into the public archives to seek the truth of the concealed path that is…

via REHYPOTHECATION IS YOUR WEAPON TO ESTABLISH THERE WAS NEVER A MORTGAGE LOAN – THESE WERE ALWAYS SECURITIES! — Deadly Clear

 

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Wells Fargo “Lending” Securities It Didn’t Own

The government really needs to revoke the national banking charter for Wells Fargo, either permanently, or for a minimum of 5-10 years. That will send a message to the other big banks that fraudulent behavior will not be tolerated.

Livinglies's Weblog

Translation: WFB was the “custodian” of alleged “mortgage-backed” certificates issued for the benefit of investors who paid billions of dollars for ownership of the certificates. WFB “Loaned” those alleged securities to brokers. The brokers in exchange provided “collateral” the proceeds of which were reinvested by WFB. In short, WFB was laundering the investors money for the sole benefit of WFB and not for the investors who owned the certificates and certainly to the detriment of the brokers and their buyers of derivative instruments based upon the loan of the securities.

This case reveals the flowering of multiple levels arising from false claims of securitization. First WFB issues certificates from a fictitious trust that owns nothing. Then it keeps both the money paid for those certificates and it keeps the certificates as well. On Wall Street this practice is called holding securities in “street name.” Then WFB engages in trading on…

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The Former Khmer Rouge Slave Who Blew the Whistle on Wells Fargo

An inspiring story of one man who escaped actual slavery only to face another form of slavery, the corporate slavery of Wells Fargo. The world needs more people like Duke Tran.

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After Duke Tran escaped from slavery, but before he became a millionaire, he was a Wells Fargo employee.

He worked at the bank’s debt-collections center near Portland, Ore., talking on the phone to customers who owed Wells Fargo money. It wasn’t glamorous, but the job enabled him to afford a two-story suburban house with mustard-colored aluminum siding. After more than three decades in the United States, Mr. Tran felt that he was the living embodiment of the American dream.

And then it all started to crumble.

In 2014, according to Mr. Tran, his boss ordered him to lie to customers who were facing foreclosure. When Mr. Tran refused, he said, he was fired. He worried that he wouldn’t be able to make his monthly mortgage payments and that he was about to become homeless.

Joining a cadre of former employees claiming they were mistreated for speaking out about problems at…

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Saving the Post Office: Letter Carriers Consider Bringing Back Banking Services

WEB OF DEBT BLOG

On July 27, 2012, the National Association of Letter Carriers adopted a resolution at their National Convention in Minneapolis to investigate establishing a postal banking system.  The resolution noted that expanding postal services and developing new sources of revenue are important to the effort to save the public Post Office and preserve living-wage jobs; that many countries have a successful history of postal banking, including Germany, France, Italy, Japan, and the United States itself; and that postal banks could serve the 9 million people who don’t have bank accounts and the 21 million who use usurious check cashers, giving low-income people access to a safe banking system.  “A USPS bank would offer a ‘public option’ for banking,” concluded the resolution, “providing basic checking and savings – and no complex financial wheeling and dealing.”

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What We Could Do with a Postal Savings Bank: Infrastructure that Doesn’t Cost Taxpayers a Dime

the infrastructure in the United States is decaying rapidly, I agree that using a postal savings bank to help fund much needed improvements is a good idea.

WEB OF DEBT BLOG

The U.S. Postal Service (USPS) is the nation’s second largest civilian employer after WalMart. Although successfully self-funded throughout its long history, it is currently struggling to stay afloat. This is not, as sometimes asserted, because it has been made obsolete by the Internet. In fact the post office has gotten more business from Internet orders than it has lost to electronic email. What has pushed the USPS into insolvency is an oppressive 2006 congressional mandate that it prefund healthcare for its workers 75 years into the future. No other entity, public or private, has the burden of funding multiple generations of employees who have not yet even been born.

The Carper-Coburn bill (S. 1486) is the subject of congressional hearings this week. It threatens to make the situation worse, by eliminating Saturday mail service and door-to-door delivery and laying off more than 100,000 workers over several years.

The Postal…

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Warren’s Post Office Proposal: Palast Aims at the Wrong Target

WEB OF DEBT BLOG

Investigative reporter Greg Palast is usually pretty good at peering behind the rhetoric and seeing what is really going on. But in tearing into Senator Elizabeth Warren’s support of postal financial services, he has done a serious disservice to the underdogs – both the underbanked and the US Postal Service itself.

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Saving the Post Office: The Models of Kiwibank and Japan Post

WEB OF DEBT BLOG

Neither rain nor sleet nor snow may have stopped the Pony Express, but the nation’s oldest and second largest employer is now under attack.  Claiming the Postal Service is bankrupt, critics are pushing legislation that would defuse the postal crisis by breaking the backs  of the postal workers’ unions and mandating widespread layoffs.  But the “crisis” is an artificial one, created by Congress itself.  

View original post 1,421 more words

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