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Altering or amending a judgment in United States District Court

Altering or amending a judgment in United States District Court is the topic of this blog post.

Altering or amending a judgment in United States District Court is authorized by Rule 59(e) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCP 59(e)).

Law that authorizes altering or amending a judgment in United States District Court.

United States District Courts have the power to “alter or amend” a judgment by motion under FRCP 59(e). The deadline for filing a Rule 59(e) motion is the same as a motion for new trial as FRCP 59(e) states that, “(e) Motion to Alter or Amend a Judgment. A motion to alter or amend a judgment must be filed no later than 28 days after the entry of the judgment.”

Deadline for altering or amending a judgment in United States District Court.

Altering or amending a judgment in United States District Court requires filing a motion within 28 calendar days after the judgment is entered. The motion is incorrectly referred to as a motion for reconsideration.

Filing a request for an order altering or amending a judgment in United States District Court can be an excellent strategy if used in the right situations.  A request that is timely filed will extend the time to file a notice of appeal under the provisions of Federal Rule of Appellate Procedure 4(a) until the entry of the order disposing of the motion.

Although FRCP 59(e) does not state any specific grounds for relief the Courts have ruled that a motion is proper where there is newly discovered evidence, the judgment is based on a clear error committed by the Court or is manifestly unjust, or an intervening change in controlling law since the date of entry of judgment.

Depending on the circumstances of any particular case a party may actually have more than 28 calendar days to file a Rule 59(e) motion as in order to start the clock running on the 28 day deadline requires a final judgment requiring a separate document under Rule 58(a) which is considered entered when the judgment is both entered in the civil docket under Rule 79(a) and either (a) it is set forth on a separate document or (b) 150 days have run from entry of the judgment in the civil docket, whichever occurs first. See Rule 58(c)(2).

The moving party must meet their burden of showing sufficient facts and evidence to support their grounds and must show that a miscarriage of justice will result if the judgment is not altered or amended.

For example a party requesting an order altering or amending a judgment on the grounds of newly discovered evidence must show that the newly discovered evidence was not available at the time of the judgment being challenged or if the evidence was available at the time of the judgment being challenged that the party or counsel made a diligent effort to discover the evidence but was unsuccessful.

Parties requesting an order altering or amending a judgment in United States District Court on the grounds of a clear error committed by the Court or that the judgment is manifestly unjust must show extreme prejudice as a result of the alleged error or otherwise show that the judgment is somehow manifestly unjust.

Lastly a party requesting to alter or amend the judgment on the grounds of an intervening change in controlling law must specifically state the particular controlling law that has been changed since the date of entry of the judgment and also the effect that change has had on the validity of the judgment.

Sample motion for order altering or amending a judgment in United States District Court for sale.

Attorneys or parties that would like to view a portion of a 13 page sample motion for an order altering or amending a judgment in United States District Court containing brief instructions, a memorandum of points and authorities with citations to case law and statutory authority, sample declaration and proof of service by mail can see below.

 

Federal legal document collection for sale.

Attorneys or parties that would like more information on a Federal legal document collection containing over 50 sample documents including a motion for an order altering or amending a judgment in United States District Court sold by the author can use the link shown below.

https://legaldocspro.myshopify.com/collections/frontpage/products/federal-legal-document-collection

The author of this blog post, Stan Burman, is a freelance paralegal who has worked in California and Federal litigation since 1995 and has created over 300 sample legal documents for sale.

For licensed attorneys and law firms that need assistance with any California or Federal litigation matters, Mr.  Burman is available on a freelance basis. Mr. Burman may be contacted by e-mail at DivParalgl@yahoo.com for more information. He accepts payments through PayPal which means that you can pay using most credit or debit cards.

Do you want to use this article on your website, blog or e-zine? You can, as long as you include this blurb with it: “Stan Burman is the author of over 300 sample legal documents for California and Federal litigation and is the author of a free weekly legal newsletter. You can receive 10 free gifts just for subscribing. Just visit freeweeklylegalnewsletter.gr8.com/ for more information.

Follow Stan Burman on Twitter at:

https://twitter.com/LegalDocsPro

DISCLAIMER:

Please note that the author of this blog post, Stan Burman is NOT an attorney and as such is unable to provide any specific legal advice. The author is NOT engaged in providing any legal, financial, or other professional services, and any information contained in this blog post is NOT intended to constitute legal advice.

The materials and information contained in this blog post have been prepared by Stan Burman for informational purposes only and are not legal advice. Transmission of the information contained in this blog post is not intended to create, and receipt does not constitute, any business relationship between the author and any readers. Readers should not act upon this information without seeking professional counsel.

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